7 ‘Game Of Thrones’ Characters Paired With Books They’d Love

7 ‘Game Of Thrones’ Characters Paired With Books They’d Love

By Sumaiyya Naseem (@sumaiyya.books)

It’s a comforting feeling when a character in a book loves to read. As bookworms ourselves, we instantly form a connection to them. Reading a good story usually develops a deep understanding of fictional characters, their struggles and dreams. Sometimes when I’m reading a good story, I think about how books could have taken away a lot of the loneliness or confusion in a character’s life.

Game of Thrones’ screen adaptation is one of my favorite shows of all times. The world the characters live in is intense, bloody and a political riot. I think some of our favorite characters, whether they’re riding dragons or playing tyrant, could do with a bit of reading time. Here are books I think they’d love:


Arya Stark
The Final Empire by Brandon Sanderson (Mistborn Book 1)

 Arya has been a favorite on the show ever since she named her sword Needle, a slight jab at her sister’s lady-like interest in sewing. Arya comes from a powerful family, but being a lady is not an option for the spirited young girl who’d rather be out exploring with the wolves. With this in mind I think Arya would be interested in reading about how Vin, a street urchin, exploits the ways of noblewomen to play politics and incite a rebellion. While she might scoff at how Vin begins to appreciate gowns and pretty windows, Arya might also learn a few tricks in the process.


Eddard Stark
To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee

 Ned Stark, the goodhearted and honorable leader of House Stark, is a man of principle, guided by the laws of his King and the land, and for this reason I think he would be intrigued by the socio-political battle in To Kill A Mockingbird. The classic reminds us of the importance of seeing people for who they are, rather than judging them based on their appearances. Ned Stark might also feel a sense of kinship towards Atticus, a man who truly believed that good would prevail in the end.


Tyrion Lannister
The Complete Works of William Shakespeare

There’s little argument that Tyrion is everyone’s favorite Lannister. With his sharp intellect and quick wit, Tyrion usually wins any argument, provides excellent counsel to his leader and comes up with mind-blowing, game-changing plans. Did I forget to mention that he loves to read?! Because of his impeccable skill in studying the people and events around him, and his obvious patience with literature, I think Tyrion would love Shakespeare, especially the tragedies like Macbeth and Hamlet. Finding layers upon layers of meaning in the Bard’s writings is almost like solving a puzzle, it can be super addicting and Tyrion feels like the kind of man who’d pour over the texts for hours. 


Jon Snow
The Catcher in the Rye by J. D. Salinger

He knows nothing, but he’s a man of honor and also a social misfit. He’s an outcast, king and rebel all at once. Jon Snow is a complicated man and this is why he’d probably feel fascinated by the proclaimer of all things phony, Holden Caulfield. It might even be a little bittersweet for the grown up and revived Jon Snow to read Holden’s narrative, but I think our King in the North needs a reminder of his sensitive side. On a side note, I won’t lie I almost picked Encyclopedia Britannica for our Jon.


Cersei Lannister
Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn

I’m not sure Cersei has the ability to love anything, except perhaps her children, but if she happened to read books, it’s likely she’d be fascinated by narratives about complex, complicated women. Because of her own cruel nature and intense ability to hate, I think Cersei would love Gone Girl. The manipulative and crazy Amy might incite some cheering on Cersei’s part, but I think she’s mostly love it for the mind games. But of course, even if Cersei did read the book and love it, no one will ever find out. Because love is a weakness that Cersei will never admit to.


Sansa Stark
A Room of One’s Own by Virginia Woolf

The Sansa we know now is a noblewoman in all sense of the word. She’s been through the unthinkable, but despite those challenges she didn’t lose her grip and learned to fight in way she’d never been taught to. And even as she defeated her enemies and empowered herself, Sansa maintained her status as the lady of an important House and used it to her advantage. While she’s already more powerful and self aware than most women (and men!!) in Westeros, Sansa would appreciate and love Woolf’s feminist work, A Room of One’s Own. It would probably added another layer to Sansa’s growth and inspire her to empower the women around her and think more deeply about the power of artistic expression.


Daenerys Targaryen
The Moor’s Account by Laila Lalami

The Mother of Dragons is a complicated woman. She’s magical, powerful and a true believer in her ability to right the world. She’s the Breaker of the Chains, a title she received by abolishing slavery in her territory. There are many books that the Khaleesi would love, but perhaps at the forefront would be The Moor’s Account, the fictional memoir of a slave stranded on an island with his masters. Based on true events, the novel recovers the voice of the silenced and provides a compelling narrative that speaks for the power of storytelling. Khaleesi would probably give a copy to everyone in her circle and beyond.


About the Author


Sumaiyya Naseem is a bibliophile from Saudi Arabia, and while she reads a bit of everything she has a keen interest in women’s fiction and immigrant stories. She shares her literary journey on Instagram (@sumaiyya.books) and is a freelance editor specializing in narratives set in Saudi Arabia. Sumaiyya is passionate about the written word and dreams of writing her own story one day.

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