Under-the-Radar Books: Selected March Reads for You

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 As we head into March (and hopefully Spring weather!) we’re excited to bring you our March Under-the-Radar reads. Memoir, anthologies, poetry, fiction and more round out this unique and diverse list. If you’re looking for something new and different to read, or want to find your next favorite author, look no further! Here are our selections for March Under-the-Radar reads.

You Don’t Have to Be Everything: Poems for Girls Becoming Themselves edited by Diana Whitney

This book of poetry celebrates young women and inspires readers with messages of self-acceptance, love and joy. Included in this collection are poems by Amanda Gorman, who read at President Joe Biden’s inauguration, Maya Angelou, and a diverse group of poets that offer readers a unique poetry experience.

The Little French Bridal Shop by Jennifer Dupee

Larisa is jobless, boyfriend-less and dealing with her mom’s dementia. When she stumbles into a bridal shop, she impulsively buys a wedding dress. The only problem? There’s no groom in sight and now the whole town is talking about her upcoming nuptials.

Dear Black Girl: Letters From Your Sisters on Stepping Into Your Power by Tamara Winfrey Harris

Tamara Winfrey Harris created the Letters to Black Girls project which went viral. She received hundreds of letters from women all over the world who wrote inspiring messages to young black girls. The result of her project is this empowering and affirming book that covers topics such as mental health, self-love, sex, grief and more. 

The Lost Apothecary by Sarah Penner

In eighteenth-century London there was a secret apothecary where women would buy poison to settle the score when men became oppressive. Present-day, Caroline Parcewell begins to learn of the apothecary murders, and she will uncover the history of the secret network of women who used poison for revenge.

A Millions Reasons Why by Jessica Strawser

A DNA test connects two half-sisters, and for one of the sisters, it’s the answer to her prayers; to the other sister, the revelation could ruin her whole life. Sela is a single mother in kidney failure who needs a live kidney donor, and she knows Caroline is her half-sister. Is her secret half-sister the match she needs in order to live, and if she shares her secret, will that ruin Caroline’s life in the process?

Surviving Savannah by Patti Callahan Henry

History professor Everly Winthrop is asked to help curate a museum collection for the steamship Pulaski, which sank after an explosion in 1838. As Everly tries to solve some of the mysteries behind the tragic sinking, she will learn of a family who was on the ship and discover their hardships, myths and truths of that horrible night.

Women in White Coats by Olivia Campbell

Three women who were frustrated with the lack of medical care in the early 1800s banded together to fight for women to have a place in the medical field. Paving the way for women in medicine today, Elizabeth Blackwell, Elizabeth Garrett Anderson and Sophia Jex-Blake created medical care for women, by women. A gripping story of how women broke the boundaries in the world of medicine. 

The Baddest Girl on the Planet by Heather Frese

Evie Austin has taken a few detours in life and made some wrong turns in the process – in career, love, and parenting, all while being obsessed with boxing champ Mike Tyson. This baddest girl on the planet needs a reckoning of sorts to get on the straight and narrow, and a new lover or a trip to Vegas will not help her situation. Evie Austin will need something more.  

Meet Me in Paradise by Libby Hubscher

After Marin Cole’s mother died, she retreated into herself while her adrenaline-fueled younger sister dealt with her grief by traveling the world. Now Sadie wants Marin to meet her for a sister weekend on a tropical island. Can Marin fight her fears and if she does, will this be a trip of a lifetime, or a nightmare? 

You Look Good for Your Age: An Anthology edited by Rona Altrows

Read stories from authors who are in their forties to their nineties in this anthology that talks about ageism. Essays, poetry, and personal stories offer thoughtful, funny and sometimes fierce perspectives on what it means to “look good for your age.”

Inside Passage by Keema Waterfield

Keema Waterfield and her two siblings followed their mother in search of music in Alaska, all in the name of the Alaskan folk festival circuit. Instead of a home, Keema got a transient life where she lived in a tent, and there were often interesting characters hanging around – musicians, drunks, a man with a gun. She digs deep into her mother’s past to try to understand her world as a child.

Justine by Forsyth Harmon

When Ali meets Justine in the Stop & Shop summer of 1999, she never thought that meeting would have a dramatic shift in her life. But the two connect, and Ali is taken by Justine and her dazzling smile. From there, Justine takes Ali under her wing and as she becomes increasingly fixated on Justine, a series of events will occur that will be of seismic proportions.

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